What do you do if your horse has a fever?

It’s always best to call a veterinarian when a horse has a high fever. A horse with a fever of 105 or higher may have strangles, Potomac Horse Fever, equine influenza or another infections; viral infections tend to produce higher fevers that bacterial infections. Endotoxemia may be another cause of fever.

How do you tell if a horse has a fever without a thermometer?

To estimate your horse’s body temperature without use of a thermometer, use your finger to assess the temperature of the mucous membrane inside the lips, at the corner of the mouth. Compare your estimated reading with a thermometer reading twice on 10 different horses.

How do you check a horse’s temperature?

To measure your horse’s temperature, use a plastic or digital “oral” or “rectal” thermometer. Oral and rectal thermometers are essentially the same thing.

How do you treat a virus in a horse?

Treatment. Once the virus gets hold of the horse there are no specific cures for the virus. Two important treatments are fever reducers and rest. For the fever butazolidine (bute) is very effective.

Can you use a human thermometer on a horse?

Any thermometer used for people can be used for a horse, but it’s helpful to have one specifically designed to be used for livestock, because they come equipped with a string to attach to the horse’s tail. This prevents the thermometer from dropping onto the ground, or from disappearing into the horse’s rectum!

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What does a sick horse look like?

Symptoms of a horse cold are similar to those seen in humans – thick nasal discharge, high temperature and swollen glands. Coughs may be a symptom of a cold, or be caused by another problem entirely, like an allergic reaction. If you suspect your horse has a cough or cold, seek the advice of a vet immediately.

How can I tell if my horse is dying?

You can often identify an aging horse by the following signs:

  • Diminished eyesight.
  • Drooping fetlocks.
  • Droopy lips.
  • Grey hair.
  • Lameness.
  • Loss of muscle mass.
  • Prominent withers.
  • Rough coat.

Do horses get a temperature with colic?

Horses suffering from colic rarely have a fever. So if your horse does have a fever (anything over 101.5 F. ) the colic is probably secondary to something else. The horse’s GI tract is very unique in a lot of ways.

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