Is my saddle too long for my horse?

A horse ridden in a saddle that is too long will often tighten his lower back muscles; in some cases, you can actually see the horse hollow and drop his back in an attempt to get away from the pressure of the saddle. He may even buck in extreme cases, in an effort to get the weight off his lumbar area.

How long should my saddle be?

Measuring your Saddle Seat Size

Your Measurement Your Saddle Size
Between 18.5″ and 20″ 16.5″ saddle
Between 20″ and 21.5″ 17″ saddle
Between 21.5″ and 23″ 17.5″ saddle
More than 23″ 18″ saddle

Is my saddle too far back horse?

A saddle positioned too far back tends to sit on the “floating ribs”. This is the “bucking reflex point” – pressure on these unsupported ribs causes considerable discomfort, which can lead to bucking as the horse tries to alleviate the pressure.

Can a saddle be too short for a horse?

A saddle can’t really BE too small for a horse – yes it can look like a pea on a drum, but as long as it is big enough for a rider it matters not.

Can a saddle pad be too long?

If it’s too long, it’ll likely rub and press against your horse’s hips. And, if it’s a heavy or stiff saddle pad, your horse’s hind legs will push pad and saddle forward.

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How far back can a saddle go?

The length of the saddle support area will determine how long the panels must be. The saddle must sit behind the shoulder. A saddle that is too long often will get driven forward into the shoulder. The saddle cannot extend past the last floating rib at the 18th thoracic vertebra.

What happens if a saddle is too wide?

When a saddle is too wide in the front, it can sink down over the withers. This takes the saddle out of balance by making the pommel lower than the cantle, which in turn carries more pressure over the front of the tree (at the withers/shoulders) than a saddle with a properly sized tree.

Where should a saddle sit on a horse?

Saddle positioning

  • The saddle needs to sit 2-3 fingers behind the shoulderblade and its muscles (see picture below). …
  • The saddle must nowhere touch the spinal processes, or the dorsal ligament system. …
  • The saddle should not extend over L3 (3rd lumbar vertebra).
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